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works at tumblr @jeffreyweston    > ask me something peculiar

July 14, 2014 at 2:18pm
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July 13, 2014 at 10:57am
427 notes
Reblogged from kttnmittonsstuff

(Source: kttnmittonsstuff, via encircle)

July 12, 2014 at 8:04am
8 notes

rip tommy ramone.

i just read a lengthy article on the ramones, which was pretty stupid. have always felt writing about rock is pretty ridiculous. instead, really you just need to watch this. if you get it, you get it. if you don’t, know the rest of us did.

July 11, 2014 at 4:53pm
931 notes
Reblogged from nevver
nevver:

Need for speed

nevver:

Need for speed

11:31am
733 notes
Reblogged from vanityfair

vanityfair:

Weird, Unseen Images from the Making of 2001: A Space Odyssey

(via kailaetc)

July 10, 2014 at 8:17am
103 notes
Reblogged from onceuponatown
onceuponatown:

LZ-126 Departs Friedrichshafen, Germany, October 12, 1924. On reaching New York, and the naval air station in Lakehurst, New Jersey, it was renamed ZR-3 The USS Los Angeles. 

onceuponatown:

LZ-126 Departs Friedrichshafen, Germany, October 12, 1924. On reaching New York, and the naval air station in Lakehurst, New Jersey, it was renamed ZR-3 The USS Los Angeles. 

July 9, 2014 at 2:21pm
crypto
1 note
Apgar’s records allowed the government to compare the messages that were submitted for approval to the censors with the signals that actually left Sayville’s aerials. Messages that seemed to contain little more than innocent commercial transactions were found to hide instructions for German submarines throughout the Atlantic. With the simple addition of a word, a space, or a minor repetition—present neither on the text submitted to the censors nor on the ticker tape produced by the machine—covert communications could be sent right under everyone’s nose. In addition, Apgar’s recordings captured unsigned messages flashed from Nauen to Sayville, transactions that hadn’t been properly registered. Apgar’s phonograph cylinders allowed an audible record of what was actually transmitted and received by the station to be poured over and decrypted by the Secret Service. The Invention of Wireless Cryptography—Vol. 2, No. 3—The Appendix

Apgar’s records allowed the government to compare the messages that were submitted for approval to the censors with the signals that actually left Sayville’s aerials. Messages that seemed to contain little more than innocent commercial transactions were found to hide instructions for German submarines throughout the Atlantic. With the simple addition of a word, a space, or a minor repetition—present neither on the text submitted to the censors nor on the ticker tape produced by the machine—covert communications could be sent right under everyone’s nose. In addition, Apgar’s recordings captured unsigned messages flashed from Nauen to Sayville, transactions that hadn’t been properly registered. Apgar’s phonograph cylinders allowed an audible record of what was actually transmitted and received by the station to be poured over and decrypted by the Secret Service. The Invention of Wireless Cryptography—Vol. 2, No. 3—The Appendix

July 8, 2014 at 7:32pm
2 notes

Senate committee adopts cybersecurity bill opposed by NSA critics

A draft of the bill released in mid-June would permit government agencies to share, retain and use the information for “a cybersecurity purpose” – defined as “the purpose of protecting an information system or information that is stored on, processed by or transiting an information system from a cybersecurity threat or security vulnerability” – raising the prospect of the NSA stockpiling a catalogue of weaknesses in digital security, as a recent White House data-assurance policy permits. Senate committee adopts cybersecurity bill opposed by NSA critics | World news | theguardian.com

July 7, 2014 at 2:53pm
15,104 notes
Reblogged from tenkaichibudokai

(via 16-bitch)

July 6, 2014 at 10:49am
2 notes

9:14am
2,099 notes
Reblogged from fargogifs

(Source: fargogifs, via monkeywonder)

July 5, 2014 at 7:05pm
30 notes
Reblogged from dinosaurspen
dinosaurspen:

GE Hardiman I exoskeleton prototype drawing, ca. 1965

dinosaurspen:

GE Hardiman I exoskeleton prototype drawing, ca. 1965

July 2, 2014 at 2:50pm
brian eno
3 notes

Brian Eno’s Quiet Influence

“I think negative ambition is a big part of what motivates artists,” Eno told me. “It’s the thing you’re pushing against. When I was a kid, my negative ambition was that I didn’t want to get a job.” Sasha Frere-Jones: Brian Eno’s Quiet Influence : The New Yorker

11:51am
ufo day
90 notes
Reblogged from todaysdocument

todaysdocument:

Celebrate #UFODay with Home Movies of UFOs from Project Blue Book:

While the records of Project Blue Book are primarily textual (to the tune of 84,000 pages), there are a handful of films that were used in the investigation.

In total, there are 18 home movies that were shot around the United States between 1952 and 1967. These films were scanned in HD from 16mm blow-ups of 8mm films. They have not been edited or altered. 

See six of these films and see if you can identify the UFOs at Media Matters » Project Blue Book: Home Movies in UFO Reports

LUKE AFB, ARIZONA, 03/03/1953

From the series: Project Blue Book Motion Picture Films, 1950 - 1966