[End Of Line]

works at tumblr @jeffreyweston    > ask me something peculiar

July 22, 2014 at 9:42am
396 notes
Reblogged from ilovecharts

Pianophase.com is a performance and visualization of the first section from Steve Reich’s 1967 piece Piano Phase. Two pianists repeat the same twelve note sequence, but one gradually speeds up. The musical patterns are visualized by drawing two lines, one following each pianist. The sound is performed live in the browser with the Web Audio API, and drawn with HTML5 Canvas.

created by Alexander Chen

(Source: ilovecharts, via kenyatta)

July 21, 2014 at 2:12pm
lego
1 note
It started in 1997. On February 13 of that year, a rogue wave hit the New York-bound cargo ship Tokio Express while it was only 20 miles off Land’s End, on Britain’s southwest coast. The ship stayed afloat; some of its cargo, however—62 shipping containers—were thrown overboard as the vessel pitched. One of these containers contained Legos. Tons of Legos—many of them, because of course, nautical-themed. There were toy kits that included plastic aquanauts. Why Are All These Legos Washing Up on the Beach? - Megan Garber - The Atlantic

It started in 1997. On February 13 of that year, a rogue wave hit the New York-bound cargo ship Tokio Express while it was only 20 miles off Land’s End, on Britain’s southwest coast. The ship stayed afloat; some of its cargo, however—62 shipping containers—were thrown overboard as the vessel pitched. One of these containers contained Legos. Tons of Legos—many of them, because of course, nautical-themed. There were toy kits that included plastic aquanauts. Why Are All These Legos Washing Up on the Beach? - Megan Garber - The Atlantic

July 20, 2014 at 7:15pm
hopex
2 notes

That was the 8th Hope conference for me. I’ve been to so many maybe I can be granted a few generalizations, or I can be forgiven a few generalizations. Everything has changed and nothing has changed. There are more people, like everywhere and every event, every place, and brunch in Brooklyn, more goddamn people. All know about it, instantly, and what their friends think about it, instantly. This is good for Hope, generally. There’s more diversity. That’s always good. People who were probably in grammar school when it started are now bringing their kids. Think of it like an alternate anarchist Disney Land (I had Bread And Puppet). Although, despite the diversity, if you were looking for men wearing sandals, cargo shorts, frizzy pony-tails carrying North Face backpacks and chuckling over network protocol jokes, this is still your con. The talks are higher quality. Generally. They are, however, less weird. I don’t mean your garden variety, or ironic, or socially acceptable weird. I mean the kind of weird that grows alone in the dark of some UFO Hollow Earth Illuminati conspiracy. I say that, but now that too of course has become ironic and normalized. (Regardless of how desperately true it may be.) Finishing the conference with a ranting Jello Biafra used to be completely appropriate. It’s not that young folk can’t take it, it’s that it all came true. Shrug. Things have changed. Nothing has changed. And the undercurrent that once told authority to fuck off, with a wink and a nod, has now by necessity thrown all in, from Manning to Snowden the level of seriousness cannot be underestimated. The individualism that once dominated via weird has now given way to businesslike solidarity. I do however fondly remember when the situation was not so grim that individuality had room to wiggle.

Hope X. Snowden.

3:34pm
1,470 notes
Reblogged from topherchris
topherchris:


  "Jesus fucking Christ, Houston. We’re on the fucking moon."


Forty-five years ago today.

topherchris:

"Jesus fucking Christ, Houston. We’re on the fucking moon."

Forty-five years ago today.

July 18, 2014 at 10:51pm
hopex
2600
1 note

"It’s better to ask forgiveness than permission." Peter Bloom and Maka Muñoz (Community owned and operated cellular networks in rural Mexico), my favorite slide via EFFs “why the future is open wireless”, and a sundry of screens in the dark. at Hope X.

July 16, 2014 at 7:23am
476 notes
Reblogged from crlblck

crlblck:

Soviet Space Program 1971

(via scientificillustration)

July 15, 2014 at 5:34pm
206 notes
Reblogged from stoneponi
stoneponi:

Ringo Starr 1963  Detail
Photo : Terence Spencer

stoneponi:

Ringo Starr 1963  Detail

Photo : Terence Spencer

July 14, 2014 at 6:53pm
410 notes
Reblogged from ageofdestruction

ageofdestruction:

gwen: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 22nd August 2007.

Image runs southwest from 71°S 56°E, just south of the Dorsa Brevia, to 80°S 34°E, just west of the Promethei Rupes; about 615 km. The dunes (dark blue) in the 4th image are inside Main Crater (Robert Main, astronomer, 1808-1878).

Composite of 3 visible light images for colour, and one monochrome image for detail. Colours are relative, not naturalistic.

Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.

(via 16-bitch)

2:18pm
0 notes

July 13, 2014 at 10:57am
387 notes
Reblogged from kttnmittonsstuff

(Source: kttnmittonsstuff, via encircle)

July 12, 2014 at 8:04am
8 notes

rip tommy ramone.

i just read a lengthy article on the ramones, which was pretty stupid. have always felt writing about rock is pretty ridiculous. instead, really you just need to watch this. if you get it, you get it. if you don’t, know the rest of us did.

July 11, 2014 at 4:53pm
908 notes
Reblogged from nevver
nevver:

Need for speed

nevver:

Need for speed

11:31am
726 notes
Reblogged from vanityfair

vanityfair:

Weird, Unseen Images from the Making of 2001: A Space Odyssey

(via kailaetc)

July 10, 2014 at 8:17am
101 notes
Reblogged from onceuponatown
onceuponatown:

LZ-126 Departs Friedrichshafen, Germany, October 12, 1924. On reaching New York, and the naval air station in Lakehurst, New Jersey, it was renamed ZR-3 The USS Los Angeles. 

onceuponatown:

LZ-126 Departs Friedrichshafen, Germany, October 12, 1924. On reaching New York, and the naval air station in Lakehurst, New Jersey, it was renamed ZR-3 The USS Los Angeles. 

July 9, 2014 at 2:21pm
crypto
1 note
Apgar’s records allowed the government to compare the messages that were submitted for approval to the censors with the signals that actually left Sayville’s aerials. Messages that seemed to contain little more than innocent commercial transactions were found to hide instructions for German submarines throughout the Atlantic. With the simple addition of a word, a space, or a minor repetition—present neither on the text submitted to the censors nor on the ticker tape produced by the machine—covert communications could be sent right under everyone’s nose. In addition, Apgar’s recordings captured unsigned messages flashed from Nauen to Sayville, transactions that hadn’t been properly registered. Apgar’s phonograph cylinders allowed an audible record of what was actually transmitted and received by the station to be poured over and decrypted by the Secret Service. The Invention of Wireless Cryptography—Vol. 2, No. 3—The Appendix

Apgar’s records allowed the government to compare the messages that were submitted for approval to the censors with the signals that actually left Sayville’s aerials. Messages that seemed to contain little more than innocent commercial transactions were found to hide instructions for German submarines throughout the Atlantic. With the simple addition of a word, a space, or a minor repetition—present neither on the text submitted to the censors nor on the ticker tape produced by the machine—covert communications could be sent right under everyone’s nose. In addition, Apgar’s recordings captured unsigned messages flashed from Nauen to Sayville, transactions that hadn’t been properly registered. Apgar’s phonograph cylinders allowed an audible record of what was actually transmitted and received by the station to be poured over and decrypted by the Secret Service. The Invention of Wireless Cryptography—Vol. 2, No. 3—The Appendix